Epidural is NOT a dirty word

Epidural is not a dirty word blog (1)

Let’s get things straight right here and now. Birth Doulas support birth. ALL births. Being a Doula for a long time, I have had to debunk the myths of what kind of support we provide on a regular basis. “I have an OB’. To which we reply “Great!”. “I’m delivering in a hospital.” To which we reply, “Great!”.  “I plan to have an epidural.” To which we reply “Great!’.

There is this vision that we as Doulas are in the corner of a candle-lit room, in a clients home, chanting and beating a drum. While there are some clients that would like the kind of support, that is not what most of us do.  As Doulas we support using tools to enjoy the experience of meeting your baby for the first time. This may include a home water birth or a medical hospital birth.

Just imagine for a minute if we take away the judgement around the tools available for safe deliveries and start thinking of them for what they really are-tools.  Breathing, position changes, baths, showers, etc are tools.  Narcotics, nitrous oxide and epidural are also tools. As a person in labour you may use a few tools or lots of tools, both medicated and unmediated.  That is totally okay.  Having options for a safe and enjoyable delivery is why we are so happy that we live where we do. With our clients we spend our prenatal visits educating expectant families on all these tools. Read more

What to do in Early Labour

Spending some time in a warm bath during early labour is one of the first suggestions for our birth clients.

Early labour or what is sometimes termed “false labour‘ can be a bit of an emotional roller coaster for expectant parents. It is a time where many are unsure of what to do and when to head into the hospital. In Toronto, many childbirth classes say to go to the hospital when the contractions are 5 minutes apart lasting a minute for at least an hour. Others say 5 minutes apart, lasting a minute for 2 hours or 4 minutes apart for a minute lasting an hour. These guidelines can be described as the 5:1:1, 5:1:2 or 4:1:1 Rule for determining when it is time to contact your medical care provider.

Confused yet?

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